Posts Tagged ‘grab bars’

Bathroom Safety and Preventing Falls

Thursday, July 6th, 2017 by morethan

According to the NHS, 6 out of 10 falls happen in a person’s home or garden, with one of the most common places being in the bathroom.

Slippery surfaces, poor lighting, loose mats, bending to wash and stepping into baths and showers are all factors for the higher number of falls in bathrooms, exacerbated by the necessity to visit the bathroom more frequently, particularly at night.

However healthcare experts also believe the majority of falls can be prevented with some changes to person’s lifestyle and home.

Below are our top 10 tips on preventing falls in your bathroom:

  1. Get rid of throw rugs. These slippery floor coverings are the main cause of household falls. If you just can’t part with them in the bathroom, secure loose rugs with double-faced tape, tacks or slip-resistant backings.
  2. Put non-slip mats in your bathtub and shower to help prevent falls. To combat tripping, secure any loose corners on mats.
  3. Keep the bathroom floor dry, making sure it has no water on it. A weighted shower curtain will help ensure that no water leaks onto the floor.
  4. Place grab bars or grab rails in or around the bathtub, shower and toilet. When installed properly and securely, they’ll help you balance as you stand or sit and give you something to hold on to if you do slip.
  5. Your bathroom should be adequately lit during the day. At night, put a nightlight on the path to the bathroom which comes on when it detects movement. Within the bathroom, use a night light, or install an illuminated switch.
  6. If your toilet seat is low, consider buying a toilet seat extender or a toilet with a higher seat. That way you can get up safely and with less effort.  Also you might want to consider a toilet surrounding frame to go around the toilet to help.
  7. Put a bath board or bench or shower stool in the shower or bathtub. You’ll then have a place to sit when washing and there is less chance of slipping.
  8. Equip your shower with a handheld or adjustable shower head. You can manoeuvre it where you want it, minimizing your movement in the shower. Also, you can use it while sitting safely on your bath seat or bench.
  9. Take your time. The more you rush, the more likely you are to fall.

10. If you struggle with getting in and out of bath then you might want to consider a lightweight bath lift.

At More Than Mobility we have a huge range of bathroom and toileting products available. If you are in need of a new bath, shower or some safety bathing mobility products please visit our website or check out our top five best-sellers:

Suction Grab Bars

12” suction cup grab bars. Grab bars provide stability and support and are commonly fitted in bathrooms and toilets where support while standing sitting or walking is often required. Price £6.99

Shower/Bath Stool

Lightweight, aluminium shower/bath stool.  Portable, height adjustable with anti-slip rubber feet.  Price £22.99

Rubber Shower Mat – Shower Mats

Avoid slip and falls in the shower with the rubber shower mat. Increase safety and confidence inside the shower, or place on the bathroom floor to assist with getting in and out of the bath or shower safely. Price £7.99

Toilet Seat & Frame

Sturdy, height adjustable toilet seat and frame designed to raise height of existing toilet to ease sitting down and standing up.  Non-slip.  Price £32.99

Bath Step

Slip resistant portable bath step that makes getting in and out of the bath easily and safely.  Adds up to 4” to the step.  Price £14.99

Best Wishes

More Than Mobility Team

www.morethanmobility.com

Tips for Safety in the Bathroom

Tuesday, August 16th, 2016 by morethan

With its slippery and hard surfaces, the bathroom can become one of the most dangerous places for falls in your own home.   Here are some useful tips for keeping you safe in the bathroom:

  1. Get rid of throw rugs. These slippery floor coverings are the main cause of household falls. If you just can’t part with them in the bathroom, secure loose rugs with double-faced tape, tacks or slip-resistant backings.
  2. Put nonslip mats in your bathtub and shower to help prevent falls. To combat tripping, secure any loose corners on mats.
  3. Keep the bathroom floor dry, making sure it has no water on it. A weighted shower curtain will help ensure that no water leaks onto the floor.
  4. Place grab bars or grab rails in or around the bathtub, shower and toilet. When installed properly and securely, they’ll help you balance as you stand or sit and give you something to hold on to if you do slip.
  5. Your bathroom should be adequately lit during the day. At night, put a nightlight on the path to the bathroom which comes on when it detects movement. Within the bathroom, use a nightlight, or install an illuminated switch.
  6. If your toilet seat is low, consider buying a toilet seat extender or a toilet with a higher seat. That way you can get up safely and with less effort.  Also you might want to consider a toilet surrounding frame to go around the toilet to help.
  7. Put a bath board or bench or shower stool in the shower or bathtub. You’ll then have a place to sit when washing and there is less chance of slipping.
  8. Equip your shower with a handheld or adjustable shower head. You can manoeuvre it where you want it, minimizing your movement in the shower. Also, you can use it while sitting safely on your bath seat or bench.
  9. Take your time. The more you rush, the more likely you are to fall.
  10. If you struggle with getting in and out of bath then you might want to consider a lightweight bath lift.

More Than Mobility supply a range of bathing and toileting aids so do take a look at our website.

Best Wishes

More Than Mobility

www.morethanmobility.com

More Than Mobility Tips to Prevent Falls In Your Own Home

Wednesday, June 15th, 2016 by morethan

Having a fall in your home is frightening, horrible and can lead to serious injury especially amongst the elderly and disabled. Unfortunately amongst the elderly if someone has regular falls this can lead to a higher mortality rate.  Therefore it is really important, wherever possible that you look at ways to prevent falls occurring in the first place.

There are many ways to prevent falling just by making small changes around the home or doing exercises to strengthen muscles.  Take a look at our useful More Than Mobility Tips To Prevent Falls in your own home below.  Also making changes will help you to overcome any fear you may have of falling.

Also discuss any falls you have had with your GP and say if it’s had any impact on your health. Your GP can carry out some simplebalance tests to check whether you are at an increased risk of falling in the future.

Avoiding falls at home

Below are some useful tips for preventing falls in the home:

  • immediately mopping up spillages
  • removing clutter, trailing wires and frayed carpet
  • using non-slip mats and rugs especially in the bathroom or where there are wet surfaces
  • using high-wattage light bulbs in lamps and torches, so you can see clearly
  • use a night light on corridors to help see at night when popping to the toilet
  • getting help to do things that you’re unable to do safely on your own like installing grab bars or toilet rails in the bathroom
  • organising your home so that climbing, stretching and bending are kept to a minimum, and to avoid bumping into things
  • installing a stair lift if you need to go up and down the stairs and are worried about falling on the stairs
  • using a walking stick, rollator or walking aid internally around the house to maintain your balance
  • not wearing loose-fitting, trailing clothes that might trip you up
  • not walking on slippery floors in socks or tights and ensure you have the correctly fitting footwear
  • wearing well-fitting shoes that are in good condition and support the ankle
  • taking care of your feet by trimming your toenails regularly and seeing a GP or chiropodist about any foot problems

Strength and balance training

Doing regular strength exercises and balance exercises can improve your strength and balance, and reduce your risk of having a fall. This can take the form of simple activities such as walking and dancing, or specialist training programmes.

Many community centres and local gyms offer specialist training programmes for older people. Exercises that can be carried out at home are also available. Your GP can help with this.

Read more about physical activity guidance for older adults.

Medication review

If you’re taking long-term medication, your GP should review your medicines at least once a year to make sure they’re still right for you. It’s particularly important that your medicines are reviewed if you’re taking four or more medicines a day.

Your GP may recommend alternative medication or lower doses if they feel the side effects increase your chances of having a fall. In some cases, it may be possible for the medication to be stopped.

See your GP or practice nurse if you haven’t had your medicines reviewed for more than a year, or if you’re concerned that the medications you or a relative are taking may increase the risk of falling.

Sight tests

You should make an appointment to have a sight test if you’re concerned that poor vision (even when wearing glasses) is increasing your risk of having a fall.

Find an optician near you.

Home hazard assessment

You can request a home hazard assessment if you’re concerned that you or a relative may be at risk of having a fall, or if you know someone who has recently had a fall. As well as identifying potential hazards, the aim of a home hazard assessment is to explore how a person’s actual use of the environment affects their risk of falling. A healthcare professional with experience in fall prevention will visit you or your relative’s home to identify potential hazards and advise on how to deal with them.

For example, as the bathroom is a common place where falls occur, many older people can benefit from having grab bars fitted to the inside of their bath to make it easier for them to get in and out.

Fitting a discreet monitoring package may also be recommended, so that you or your relative can signal for help in the event of a fall. An alternative would be to keep a mobile phone within reach, so it’s possible to phone for help after having a fall.

Alcohol

Drinking alcohol can lead to loss of co-ordination and exaggerate the effects of some medicines. This can significantly increase the risk of a fall, particularly in older people.

Avoiding alcohol or reducing the amount you drink can reduce your risk of having a fall. Excessive drinking can also contribute to the development of osteoporosis.

More Than Mobility supplies a range of mobility products to help with fall prevention around your home including walking aids, stair lifts, grab bars and toilet rails so do take a look at our website or call us on 0800 046 3949 for further advice.

Best wishes

More Than Mobility Team

www.morethanmobility.com

What Are Grab Bars?

Tuesday, May 17th, 2016 by morethan

Grab bars are safety devices designed to enable a person to maintain balance, lessen fatigue while standing, hold some of their

weight while manoeuvring, or have something to grab onto in case of a slip or fall.  A caregiver may also use a grab bar to assist with transferring a patient from one place to another.

Grab bars next to a toilet help people using a wheelchair transfer to the toilet seat and back to the wheelchair. They also assist people who have difficulty sitting down, have balance problems while seated or need help rising from a seated position.

Used in a shower or bathtub, grab bars help to maintain balance while standing or manoeuvring, assist in transferring into and out of the enclosure, and generally help to mitigate slips and falls.

Floor to ceiling grab bars, or security poles, can be used in the bedroom to help one get out of bed or get up from a chair, or to help caregivers by assisting in transfers.

Grab bars are often used in conjunction with other medical devices to increase safety. For example, a grab bar added to a shower is frequently used with a shower chair and hand held shower head. Grab bars installed by a doorway are usually added near a railing. In addition, grab bars can be placed on any wall where extra support is needed even if it is not the “usual place” they are used.

Perfect for giving that extra support when searching for keys, opening or closing the front or back door or negotiating the door step.

Here at More Than Mobility we offer a range of grab bars such as economy grab bars, suction cup grab bars and drop down safety rails.   Available in range of sizes from as little as £5.99!

Best wishes

More Than Mobility Team

www.morethanmobility.com

Mobility Products Suitable Post Hip Replacements

Tuesday, March 1st, 2016 by morethan

If you or a loved one are about to have a new hip/hip replacement we recommend getting your home ready with some useful mobility products to help during your recovery and making those daily chores a little bit easier.

It is good practice to set up your home before surgery so you don’t have to worry about it later and is all properly prepared for your arrival home from hospital.  

Below is a list of useful advice and a list of some of the most popular mobility products we get asked for by our More Than Mobility customers when they have had hip surgery.

Make sure things are easy to get to

Make sure everything you need is easy to get to and on the same floor where you will spend most of your time.

  • Have a toilet or a portable commode on the same floor where you will spend most of your day.  Take a look at our best-selling commodes.
  • Make sure you can reach everything you need without getting on your tiptoes or bending down low.  It might be worth considering buying a reacher.
  • Make sure you can get to your phone. A portable phone can be helpful.
  • Place a chair with a firm back in the kitchen, bedroom, bathroom, and other rooms you will use. This way, you can sit when you do your daily tasks.
  • If you will be using a walking aid such as a tri-walker or rollator, attach a sturdy bag or a small basket to it to hold your phone, a notepad, a pen, and another other things you will need to have close by. You could also use a bum bag.
  • If you will need to use the stairs, you should limit using them to once a day.  If you are concerned about using your stairs especially if you are alone you could always consider a stair lift.

Other useful items that can help

  • Shoe horn with a long handle to help putting on your shoes
  • Sock puller to help with putting on socks and tights
  • Folding height adjustable walking stick to keep you steady post the operation
  • Leg lifter to help lifting your foot and legs in and out of bed

Bathroom & Toilets

You may want or need to have a few mobility products installed in your bathroom or toilet to help you when going to the loo or getting in and out of the bath/shower.

  • Raised toilet seats and toilet frames are useful as they will help limit movement to the hip joint when going to the loo which is very important post hip replacement surgery.
  • Sit on a bath board or a shower stool or shower seat when washing.
  • Safety Grab Bars to allow you to steady yourself when getting in and out of the bath. One for helping with standing to sitting position. The other helps you stand from a sitting position.  Grab bars should be secured vertically or horizontally to the wall, not diagonally.
  • Drop down safety rails can assist with independent toileting and bathing and folds up when not in use.
  • Put non-slip suction mats in the shower or bath to prevent falls and use a slip resistant bath step if required.
  • Use a non-skid bath mat outside the tub for firm footing.
  • Consider a long handle shower sponge to help reach those difficult places.
  • Finally if need help getting in and out of the bath you might want to consider a portable lightweight bath lift.

Best Wishes

More Than Mobility Team

www.morethanmobility.com