Posts Tagged ‘powerchairs’

The Highway Code for Mobility Scooters and Powered Wheelchairs

Wednesday, February 3rd, 2016 by morethan

This week we would like to update our mobility scooter and wheelchair / power wheelchair users of the Highway Code. This is a set of rules all road and pavement users should follow to stay safe and protect other pedestrians and road users.

This is really important as we know that a small few mobility scooter users tend to ignore these rules and therefore give the rest of mobility scooter and wheelchair users a bad name and court bad press which is not what we want for the industry as a whole.

Some of the key rules to follow on the road and pavement include:

Powered wheelchairs and mobility scooters (rules 36 to 37)

Rule 36

There is one class of manual wheelchair (called a Class 1 invalid carriage) and two classes of powered wheelchairs and powered mobility scooters (Class 2 and Class 3). Manual wheelchairs and Class 2 vehicles are those with an upper speed limit of 4 mph and are designed to be used on pavements. Class 3 vehicles are those with an upper speed limit of 8 mph and are equipped to be used on the road as well as the pavement.

Rule 37

When you are on the road you should obey the guidance and rules for other vehicles; when on the pavement you should follow the guidance and rules for pedestrians.

On pavements (rules 38 to 40)

Rule 38

Pavements are safer than roads and should be used when available. You should give pedestrians priority and show consideration for other pavement users, particularly those with a hearing or visual impairment who may not be aware that you are there.

Rule 39

Powered wheelchairs and scooters MUST NOT travel faster than 4 mph on pavements or in pedestrian areas. You may need to reduce your speed to adjust to other pavement users who may not be able to move out of your way quickly enough or where the pavement is too narrow.

Rule 40

When moving off the pavement onto the road, you should take special care. Before moving off, always look round and make sure it’s safe to join the traffic. Always try to use dropped kerbs when moving off the pavement, even if this means travelling further to locate one. If you have to climb or descend a kerb, always approach it at right angles and don’t try to negotiate a kerb higher than the vehicle manufacturer’s recommendations.

On the road (rules 41 to 46)

Rule 41

You should take care when travelling on the road as you may be travelling more slowly than other traffic (your machine is restricted to 8 mph and may be less visible).

Rule 42

When on the road, Class 3 vehicles should travel in the direction of the traffic. Class 2 users should always use the pavement when it is available. When there is no pavement, you should use caution when on the road. Class 2 users should, where possible, travel in the direction of the traffic. If you are travelling at night lights MUST be used and you should travel in the direction of the traffic to avoid confusing other road users.

Rule 43

You MUST follow the same rules about using lights, indicators and horns as for other road vehicles, if your vehicle is fitted with them. At night, lights MUST be used. Be aware that other road users may not see you and you should make yourself more visible – even in the daytime and also at dusk – by, for instance, wearing a reflective jacket or reflective strips on the back of the vehicle.

Rule 44

Take extra care at road junctions. When going straight ahead, check to make sure there are no vehicles about to cross your path from the left, the right, or overtaking you and turning left. There are several options for dealing with right turns, especially turning from a major road. If moving into the middle of the road is difficult or dangerous, you can

  • stop on the left-hand side of the road and wait for a safe gap in the traffic
  • negotiate the turn as a pedestrian, i.e. travel along the pavement and cross the road between pavements where it is safe to do so. Class 3 users should switch the vehicle to the lower speed limit when on pavements.

If the junction is too hazardous, it may be worth considering an alternative route. Similarly, when negotiating major roundabouts (i.e. with two or more lanes) it may be safer for you to use the pavement or find a route which avoids the roundabout altogether.

Rule 45

All normal parking restrictions should be observed. Your vehicle should not be left unattended if it causes an obstruction to other pedestrians – especially those in wheelchairs. Parking concessions provided under the Blue Badge scheme (see further reading) will apply to those vehicles displaying a valid badge.

Rule 46

These vehicles MUST NOT be used on motorways (see Rule 253). They should not be used on unrestricted dual carriageways where the speed limit exceeds 50 mph but if they are used on these dual carriageways, they MUST have a flashing amber beacon. A flashing amber beacon should be used on all other dual carriageways (see Rule 220).

For a more in depth guide please see the full Highway Code at the Government Website.

Mobility Insurance:

Although mobility insurance is not compulsory, we strongly advise that you take out a specific mobility insurance policy.  This will cover you for accidental fire, flood, loss or damage due to theft and also will cover you up to £2 million pounds public and private liability in case of an accident.

Our insurance policies start from as little as £86 per annum – click here for more information on our range of insurance policies.

Finally if you are thinking about buying a new mobility scooter or powerchair please visit the More Than Mobility website or if you are confused or need any further advice on the Highway Code please do not hesitate to give us a call.

Stay safe on the roads and pavements!

Best Wishes

More than Mobility Team

www.morethanmobility.com

The Best-Selling Portable Reno II Powerchair!

Tuesday, November 17th, 2015 by morethan

More Than Mobility stock many electric wheelchairs & powerchairs but we wanted to let you know that we also stock the widely searched and best-selling Roma Reno II Powerchair!

This portable power chair is suitable for both indoor and outdoor use. It is compact and stylish and comes with a large storage compartment and easy to use controls.  The base unit splits down into two separate parts to allow easy transportation and reduces the weight of heaviest part.

We currently stock the latest design!

The latest 2014 design includes an improved basket access and size!  An easy to lift seat, the controller connector is now fixed to the rear motor – as opposed to it being cable-tied to the top of the frame. The battery pack has been re-designed – which allows it to be lifted straight out and not at an angle. No exposed wiring within the battery box or around the motors – as per the original model.  The motors have also been re-positioned on the frame. They now run along the side of the frame as opposed to being housed side by side.

Due to its new design the Reno II Powerchair is now much easier to navigate around hallways and living rooms.  Plus if you need to pop to the shops it now comes with an impressive range of up to 12.5 miles on one battery charge!

Features:

  • Portable electric wheelchair – suitable for indoor and outdoor use
  • Compact and lightweight
  • Detachable battery pack
  • Flip-up, height adjustable footplate
  • Flip up, width adjustable armrests
  • Storage basket
  • Easily disassembly without tools for carrying, storage and transportation
  • Comfortable padded seat
  • Non-marking puncture proof tyres
  • Intelligent, regenerative, electromagnetic brakes
  • Range up to 12.5 miles and user weight up to 21 stone
  • On & off board charger
  • Available in choice of red or blue

The Reno II Electric Wheelchair comes with a full 12 month in home warranty so if you have any issues you have full peace of mind.  Currently available for only £1,150 so take a look at today!

Best wishes

More Than Mobility Team

www.morethanmobility.com

Guidance on Getting an Electric Wheelchair/Powerchair

Thursday, August 6th, 2015 by morethan

The consumer research charity Rica, has published a new guide called “Getting a Powered Wheelchair: a guide to help you choose” – available free online and in print. Between April and July 2014 Rica surveyed 374 disabled people, asking them for their views and experiences of choosing, funding and maintaining a powered wheelchair.

This guide provides unbiased and practical information about:

  • paying for a powered wheelchair, including funding options
  • getting assessed for and how to find out about products on the market
  • types and features of power-chairs and electric wheelchairs

It also provides real life stories by electric wheelchair & powered wheelchair users and a list of useful organisations that can provide further information and support.

Rica asked disabled people about:

  • getting information and advice on choosing a powered wheelchair or electric wheelchair
  • the assessment process
  • funding for a powered wheelchair
  • maintenance and after-sales service
  • any barriers they experienced

Dr Phil Friend OBE and Rica Trustee said: “As an experienced wheelchair user, I know that choosing and buying a powered wheelchair is a crucial decision and it’s important to get it right first time. There are no independent product tests, meaningful reviews or simple guidance to help people through this daunting and often confusing process. Services and support vary depending on where you are, what you need and what funding is available. With more than 300 models available, getting the right one to suit individual needs is vital and this where the new Rica guide can help.”

The survey of 374 powered wheelchair users found that disabled people and their families often struggle to:

  • Locate relevant information about funding options – 48% didn’t get the right information
  • Make an informed choice about provision – over a third (37%) get no assessment
  • Get value for money when buying and maintaining their powered wheelchair – 32% had to fund their own powered wheelchair completely themselves with a quarter (26%) being turned down for NHS funding.

Rica’s report follows a few recent developments in wheelchair services:

  1. My Voice, My Wheelchair, My Life is an online campaign which aims to transform wheelchair services for users and their families
  2. The Right Chair, Right Time, Right Now campaign aims to raise awareness of issues in wheelchair services: “There are around 1.2 million wheelchair users in the UK, roughly two per cent of the UK population, and whilst some people receive a good service too many have to wait too long for a wheelchair or to receive a wheelchair that is suitable for their needs”
  3. CECOPS, an independent social enterprise that aims to raise the standard of wheelchair services has introduced comprehensive standards and accreditation guidelines.

More Than Mobility understand how powered wheelchairs have the potential to help many disabled adults to be moreindependent and the correct supportive seating can reduce the need for future medical interventions. We currently have offers on our power-chairs with savings of up to £200!  Do take a look at our electric wheelchair & powerchair range.

Best wishes

More Than Mobility Team

www.morethanmobility.com